Jesus. Real Life.

Posts tagged “stewardship

Replay: “Sure, I’ll manage that for you . . .”

Love that green

Love that green

(This is an old post that maybe helps understand some of the more recent topics . . . enjoy)

 

It’s unfortunate to me that the word that best encapsulates current evangelical teaching on money is ‘stewardship.’ I totally dig the reasoning that God owns everything, therefore, I must steward his stuff, not mine. However, we’re running by a few steps that Jesus camped out on. I think it’s fair to say that whenever Jesus talked about money, he talked like he was talking to a group of addicts. As always, I’m open to hearing some disagreement on that point, but I don’t think the guts of his message was “steward it”; the guts of his teaching seems to be “put it down, and then take my hand.” Now, what happens when you tell a group of addicts to ‘steward’ the object of their affection? . . . Something very similar to what we have now in American churches, I think. Of course, our whole lives become an issue of stewardship (being a good, trustworthy servant) eventually, but we’ve got to give up ‘stewarding’ our very lives before we’re even a student of Jesus (again, according to Jesus). The first issue that must be dealt with, and repeated as necessary, is our white-knuckle grip on our lives, our dreams, our cash. Jesus’ counsel is not to steward it, but to lose it, and follow him.

I know this has big implications. But the first issue to be dealt with when it comes to money isn’t stewardship or tithing, but attachment, at least according to Jesus.


"Sure, I’ll manage that for you . . ."

It’s unfortunate to me that the word that best encapsulates current evangelical teaching on money is ‘stewardship.’ I totally dig the reasoning that God owns everything, therefore, I must steward his stuff, not mine. However, we’re running by a few steps that Jesus camped out on. I think it’s fair to say that whenever Jesus talked about money, he talked like he was talking to a group of addicts. As always, I’m open to hearing some disagreement on that point, but I don’t think the guts of his message was “steward it”; the guts of his teaching seems to be “put it down, and then take my hand.” Now, what happens when you tell a group of addicts to ‘steward’ the object of their affection? . . . Something very similar to what we have now in American churches, I think. Of course, our whole lives become an issue of stewardship (being a good, trustworthy servant) eventually, but we’ve got to give up ‘stewarding’ our very lives before we’re even a student of Jesus (again, according to Jesus). The first issue that must be dealt with, and repeated as necessary, is our white-knuckle grip on our lives, our dreams, our cash. Jesus’ counsel is not to steward it, but to lose it, and follow him.

I know this has big implications. But the first issue to be dealt with when it comes to money isn’t stewardship or tithing, but attachment, at least according to Jesus.